DasGangPferdeForum
Registrierung Galerie Kalender Mitgliederliste Teammitglieder Suche Top-Poster des Monats Häufig gestellte Fragen

 
Boardmenü
» Forum
» Portal

» Registrieren
» Suche
» Statistik
» Mitglieder
» Team
» Kalender
» Sponsoren
» Partner

» F.A.Q

HP-Menü

» Boardregeln

» Chat-Room

» Neue Beiträge

» Gästebuch

» Pranger

» User-Friedhof

 


TopPoster
» Wisy
mit 6907 Beiträgen
seit dem 20.07.2009

» rivera
mit 6771 Beiträgen
seit dem 07.10.2007

» Lexi
mit 5768 Beiträgen
seit dem 16.10.2013

» Velvakandi
mit 5622 Beiträgen
seit dem 07.10.2007

» tryggvi
mit 3870 Beiträgen
seit dem 16.10.2013


Zufallsbild

Heutige Termine
Ihnen fehlen die Rechte dazu um den Inhalt dieser Box zu sehen.

neuste Mitglieder
» Sandino13
registriert am: 09.11.2018

» Mips
registriert am: 08.11.2018

» Brisingir
registriert am: 04.11.2018

» Prinzebaer
registriert am: 30.10.2018

» Kati Moll
registriert am: 30.10.2018


DasGangPferdeForum » Rund ums Gangpferd » Gesundheit und Krankheiten » Atypische Weidemyopathie » Hallo Gast [Anmelden|Registrieren]
Letzter Beitrag | Erster ungelesener Beitrag Druckvorschau | An Freund senden | Thema zu Favoriten hinzufügen
Neues Thema erstellen Antwort erstellen
Zum Ende der Seite springen Atypische Weidemyopathie
Autor
Beitrag « Vorheriges Thema | Nächstes Thema »
Ragna Ragna ist weiblich
Reitpferd


images/avatars/avatar-605.jpg

Dabei seit: 17.10.2013
Beiträge: 1.329
Herkunft: Nordbaden, aber z. Z. Aargau

Bewertung: 
3 Bewertung(en) - Durchschnitt: 10,00

Level: 41 [?]
Erfahrungspunkte: 2.462.406
Nächster Level: 2.530.022

67.616 Erfahrungspunkt(e) für den nächsten Levelanstieg

Atypische Weidemyopathie Auf diesen Beitrag antworten Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       Zum Anfang der Seite springen

In einem anderen Forum hatte ich am 26. Juni 2013 veröffentlicht:


2 Ahorn-Arten unter dringendem Verdacht

Soeben auf Horsetalk.co.nz gefunden:

Read more: http://horsetalk.co.nz/2013/06/20/study-.../#ixzz2XKm2jAPS
Reuse: You may use up to 20 words and link back to this page. Other reuse not permitted
Follow us: @HorsetalkNZ on Twitter | Horsetalk on Facebook


Toxins from the seeds of the sycamore tree (Acer pseudoplatanus) are the likely cause of the often fatal horse disease, Atypical Myopathy, in Europe, a new study concludes.
The research findings were published this month in Equine Veterinary Journal.
The common name for the tree is sycamore in Britain, but it is also known as the sycamore maple in some other countries.
There is further potential for confusion because a completely different tree, Platanus occidentalis, is known as the sycamore, or American Sycamore, in the United States.
The new research follows hot on the heels of a study in the US earlier this year that linked toxins from the box elder tree (Acer negundo) with Seasonal Pasture Myopathy (SPM), the US equivalent of Atypical Myopathy.
The discovery marks an important step for the future prevention of this fatal disease.
Atypical Myopathy is a highly fatal muscle disease in Britain and Northern Europe.
In 10 years, about 20 European countries have reported the disease.
Cases tend to occur repeatedly in the autumn and in the spring following large autumnal outbreaks.
Horses that develop Atypical Myopathy are usually kept in sparse pastures with an accumulation of dead leaves, dead wood and trees in or around the pasture and are often not fed any supplementary hay or feed.
Seasonal Pasture Myopathy is a similar disorder, prevalent in the Midwest US and Eastern Canada, that is now known to be caused by the ingestion of hypoglycin A, contained in seeds from the box elder tree.
The new European research was conducted by an international team led by Dominic Votion, from the University of Liege, and involved 17 horses from Belgium, Germany and The Netherlands, suffering from Atypical Myopathy.
High concentrations of a toxic metabolite of hypoglycin A, were identified in the serum of all of the horses.
The pastures of 12 of the horses were visited by experienced botanists and the Acer pseudoplatanus, the sycamore maple, was found to be present in every case. This was the only tree common to all visited pastures.
Researchers believe hypoglycin A is the likely cause of both Atypical Myopathy in Europe and Seasonal Pasture Myopathy in North America.
The sycamore and the box elder are known to produce seeds containing hypoglycin A and the pastures of the afflicted horses in Europe and the US were surrounded by these trees.
Hypoglycin-A is found in various levels in the seeds of plants in the genus Acer, as well as in various other genera in the family Sapindaceae such as ackee (Blighia sapida).
In ackee, hypoglycin-A levels vary with ripeness of the fruit and, if the fruit is eaten before it is mature, it causes hypoglycaemia to different degrees, including a condition called “Jamaican vomiting sickness” (because of ackee’s use in Jamaican cooking) and occasionally death in humans.
Researchers at the universities of Minnesota and Liege are continuing their work to try to uncover exactly how the equine disease occurs.
Discussing the on-going research there, Dr Adrian Hegeman and Dr Jeff Gillman, of the University of Minnesota, point out: “It is likely that the most important contributing factors to horses becoming poisoned by hypoglycin-A are the availability of seed in the field combined with lack of other feeding options.
“The seeds from two species of maples – box elder and sycamore maples – that we have tested include significant quantities of hypoglycin-A. We know that seeds contain highly variable quantities from seed to seed, even within a single tree.


Ingestion of seeds from the Box elder tree can cause Seasonal Pasture Myopathy. Box elder seeds before fall.
“We do not know yet how hypoglycin-A levels vary seasonally, nor do we know how its abundance varies with different levels of stress to the plant, though this may well explain seasonal variability in the occurrence of the malady. It is possible that conditions that stress the plants may contribute to significant seasonal changes in hypoglycin-A levels. At this point we just don’t know.
“It is common held knowledge that trees under stress usually produce more seed.”
Gillman went on to comment: “Without question, further analysis of the seeds and other tissues from Acer species needs to be performed along with sampling of plant materials over multiple seasons and at various stress levels.
“Additionally, one cannot rule out more complex explanations for the seasonality of disease occurrence such as: animals may begin feeding on seed materials in response to depletion of more palatable choices under drought conditions; or simple explanations such as high wind events driving seeds into fields.
“These sorts of explanations for the occurrence of the disease do not depend on botanical variations in toxicity across seasons, sites or stress levels, yet also require consideration.”
Although limited examples are available, the experience of animals at a pasture site might also confer some degree of behavioral resistance to poisoning due to exposure at sub-lethal levels with prior exposure to seeds in the pasture.
Professor Celia Marr, editor of the Equine Veterinary Journal, said: “This is an important advancement in our understanding of what causes Atypical Myopathy and how it can be prevented.
“In immediate practical terms owners can take prompt measures to avoid exposing their horses to sycamore seeds this autumn.
“Where horses are grazing in the vicinity of sycamore trees, it is imperative that they are provided with sufficient supplementary feed as this will minimise the risk that horses might be tempted to ingest seeds containing this toxin.
“This must be done carefully and leaving wet hay on the ground should be avoided so providing extra carbohydrate feeds may be more practical.”


The European study can be accessed at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.11....12117/abstract
Related research from the University of Minnesota can be accessed at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.11...0684.x/abstract



Mit sycamore is der in Europa heimische Berg-Ahorn (Acer pseudoplatanus) gemeint, und mit box elder der ursprünglich in Nordamerika beheimatete, schon seit Jahrhunderten in Europa eingeführte Eschen-Ahorn (Acer negundo).

__________________
Lady Gáta (1988-2004)
Schlitzohr und Schlaumeier Ragna
Streber Fengari

Wahrheit hat die verblüffende Eigenschaft, sich immer wieder zurückzumelden. Bruno Bänninger

27.09.2018 13:20 Ragna ist offline E-Mail an Ragna senden Beiträge von Ragna suchen Nehmen Sie Ragna in Ihre Freundesliste auf
Ragna Ragna ist weiblich
Reitpferd


images/avatars/avatar-605.jpg

Dabei seit: 17.10.2013
Beiträge: 1.329
Herkunft: Nordbaden, aber z. Z. Aargau

Bewertung: 
3 Bewertung(en) - Durchschnitt: 10,00

Level: 41 [?]
Erfahrungspunkte: 2.462.406
Nächster Level: 2.530.022

67.616 Erfahrungspunkt(e) für den nächsten Levelanstieg

Themenstarter Thema begonnen von Ragna
RE: Atypische Weidemyopathie Auf diesen Beitrag antworten Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Am 27. Juni 2013 gab es diese Ergänzung:

Platanus occidentalis (Amerikanische oder Westliche Platane lt. Wikipedia) ist eine andere Baumart, die vermutlich nicht gefährlich ist. In der zitierten Studie geht es um die Giftigkeit zweier Acer-Arten: Acer pseudoplatanus (Berg-Ahorn, in Europa heimisch) und Acer negundo (Eschen-Ahorn, ursprünglich in Nordamerika beheimatet). Ahornsirup wird aus Acer saccharum (Zucker-Ahorn) gewonnen und ist nicht giftig.


Am selben Tag antwortete eine ausgebildete Gärtnerin aus der Schweiz:

Acer negundo ist bei uns ausserhalb von Gärten fast nie vorhanden. Auch in den Gärten ist er meist in einer Sorte mit zweifarbigen Blättern anzutreffen, welche sich fast nicht durch Sämlinge verbreitet. Acer saccharum kommt auch sehr selten, und eigentlich fast nur in Gärten vor...

Acer pseudoplatanus ist der bei uns am meisten vorkommende Ahorn.


Mich erstaunt es ein wenig, dass jetzt plötzlich so ein Drama um den Ahorn gemacht wird! Mir wurde von den alten Bauern schon als kleines Kind erklärt, dass Pferde möglichst kein Ahorn Laub, oder Schösslinge fressen sollten, weil dies ihnen schaden kann.


Diese letzte Erläuterung lässt ahnen, wieviel altes Wissen inzwischen verlorengegangen ist.

__________________
Lady Gáta (1988-2004)
Schlitzohr und Schlaumeier Ragna
Streber Fengari

Wahrheit hat die verblüffende Eigenschaft, sich immer wieder zurückzumelden. Bruno Bänninger

27.09.2018 13:25 Ragna ist offline E-Mail an Ragna senden Beiträge von Ragna suchen Nehmen Sie Ragna in Ihre Freundesliste auf
Schnucki10 Schnucki10 ist weiblich
Reitpferd


Dabei seit: 18.01.2017
Beiträge: 1.247

Bewertung: 
2 Bewertung(en) - Durchschnitt: 10,00

Level: 36 [?]
Erfahrungspunkte: 827.932
Nächster Level: 1.000.000

172.068 Erfahrungspunkt(e) für den nächsten Levelanstieg

Auf diesen Beitrag antworten Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Update VFD 2017:

https://www.vfdnet.de/index.php/partner-...-fruehling-2017

LMU München:
https://www.pferd.vetmed.uni-muenchen.de...thie/index.html

Uni Liege/Belgien mit neuesten Updates:
http://labos.ulg.ac.be/myopathie-atypique/recherches/
27.09.2018 16:10 Schnucki10 ist offline E-Mail an Schnucki10 senden Beiträge von Schnucki10 suchen Nehmen Sie Schnucki10 in Ihre Freundesliste auf
Morgaine Morgaine ist weiblich
Reitpferd


Dabei seit: 16.10.2013
Beiträge: 746
Herkunft: HVL

Bewertung: 
1 Bewertung(en) - Durchschnitt: 10,00

Level: 38 [?]
Erfahrungspunkte: 1.382.658
Nächster Level: 1.460.206

77.548 Erfahrungspunkt(e) für den nächsten Levelanstieg

RE: Atypische Weidemyopathie Auf diesen Beitrag antworten Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Zitat:
Original von Ragna
Acer negundo ist bei uns ausserhalb von Gärten fast nie vorhanden. Auch in den Gärten ist er meist in einer Sorte mit zweifarbigen Blättern anzutreffen, welche sich fast nicht durch Sämlinge verbreitet


Bei uns wächst der Eschenahorn (grüne Blätter, nicht rosa-zweifarbig) leider überall: den ganzen Bach entlang - von Grünefeld nach Paaren - links vom Bach sind Pferde-Weiden von verschiedenen Höfen, und rechts ein gut reitbarer Weg.
Die Bäume müssen schon lange da stehen - sind riesig - und gehören der Gemeinde, also nicht dem Weidenbesitzer. Sie geben wunderschön Schatten. Und die Samen fliegen weit, man findet überall in der Umgebung kleine neue Sträucher.

Schön ist das nicht.

M.
16.10.2018 13:57 Morgaine ist offline E-Mail an Morgaine senden Beiträge von Morgaine suchen Nehmen Sie Morgaine in Ihre Freundesliste auf
Ragna Ragna ist weiblich
Reitpferd


images/avatars/avatar-605.jpg

Dabei seit: 17.10.2013
Beiträge: 1.329
Herkunft: Nordbaden, aber z. Z. Aargau

Bewertung: 
3 Bewertung(en) - Durchschnitt: 10,00

Level: 41 [?]
Erfahrungspunkte: 2.462.406
Nächster Level: 2.530.022

67.616 Erfahrungspunkt(e) für den nächsten Levelanstieg

Themenstarter Thema begonnen von Ragna
Auf diesen Beitrag antworten Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Da hatte ich eine Schweizer Gärtnerin zitiert (ich hätte außerhalb, nicht ausserhalb, geschrieben). So wie es aussieht, gibt es den Eschenahorn außerhalb der Schweiz nicht nur in Gärten.

Das ist ja extrem doof mit dem Eschenahorn. Die Gemeinde muss aber unbedingt darauf angesprochen werden, finde ich. Allerdings weiß ich nicht, ob nur Pferde so betroffen sind oder auch andere Tiere wie z. B. Kühe.

__________________
Lady Gáta (1988-2004)
Schlitzohr und Schlaumeier Ragna
Streber Fengari

Wahrheit hat die verblüffende Eigenschaft, sich immer wieder zurückzumelden. Bruno Bänninger

16.10.2018 16:54 Ragna ist offline E-Mail an Ragna senden Beiträge von Ragna suchen Nehmen Sie Ragna in Ihre Freundesliste auf
Baumstruktur | Brettstruktur
Gehe zu:
Neues Thema erstellen Antwort erstellen
DasGangPferdeForum » Rund ums Gangpferd » Gesundheit und Krankheiten » Atypische Weidemyopathie

Views heute: 15.992 | Views gestern: 47.576 | Views gesamt: 83.165.784

Impressum

Forensoftware: Burning Board 2.3.6, entwickelt von WoltLab GmbH